Your address will show here +12 34 56 78
Videos


We Are Mitu Media:


Despierta America


StonyBrook


Jahzel Review
Bad Hair Does Not Exist


Article


  • Text Hover
Believe in Books Interview Series: Sulma Arzu-Brown

Sulma Arzu-Brown is a proud Garifuna woman born in Honduras, Central America. The Garifuna people are the Black Caribs living in the coastland of Central America. She came to New York City at the tender age of six. Throughout her life, Sulma’s parents instilled in her the belief that progressive thinking, education and sound values were the key to success in one’s personal and professional life.  Holding steadfast to those values, Sulma received her Bachelor of Arts degree from Herbert Lehman College of the City University of New York.  Sulma took those teachings a step further when she became a mother by becoming one with her essence and growing out her natural hair.  

  • Text Hover
El "pelo malo" de las niñas afrolatinas se peina con educación

Sulma Arzu-Brown is a proud Garifuna woman born in Honduras, Central America. The Garifuna people are the Black Caribs living in the coastland of Central America. She came to New York City at the tender age of six. Throughout her life, Sulma’s parents instilled in her the belief that progressive thinking, education and sound values were the key to success in one’s personal and professional life.  Holding steadfast to those values, Sulma received her Bachelor of Arts degree from Herbert Lehman College of the City University of New York.  Sulma took those teachings a step further when she became a mother by becoming one with her essence and growing out her natural hair.  

  • Text Hover
‘Bad Hair’ Does Not Exist

I’m 5 feet tall, if you round up. People calling out “Yo shorty” is part of my daily dose of swagalicious ghetto twang.

My name is Sulma, and I am a Garifuna from Honduras. My mother moved us to the United States in 1985 because she believed living here would be our only shot at success. Despite the challenges of growing up in the South Bronx and my own typical teenage drama, I graduated college, got a good job, married a man like my dad and built a home like that of my own upbringing. This “shorty” was no joke.

 

From the age of 12 on, I spent a minimum of three hours every six weeks at the hair salon getting my hair relaxed. I did a weekly wash and roller set. Without fail, this was my routine summer, spring, winter or fall…….

  • Text Hover
FEATURE: WRITER SULMA ARZU-BROWN PENS CHARMING BILINGUAL CHILDREN’S BOOK "BAD HAIR DOES NOT EXIST/PELO MALO NO EXISTE"

 Saying that hair in the black community is a sensitive subject is a bit of an understatement. Especially in American society where nappy/kinky/coily/ziggly/corse hair is scarcely represented in the already limited representation of black people in the media, where creamy crack and weaves are staples of (what is sometimes) forced assimilation into mainstream (read: white) culture and where there are countless examples of natural hair being unacceptable in schools and in the workplace…….

   

  • Text Hover
Why This Mom Wrote A Bilingual Book Called ‘Bad Hair Doesn’t Exist’

Many of us grew up hearing about “pelo malo,” but Afro-Latina mom Sulma Arzu-Brown wants to make it clear that bad hair doesn’t exist.
MORE: The True Meaning Behind the Natural Hair Movement
The Garifuna, an Afro-Latino from Honduras, Guatemala or Nicaragua, mujer recently published a bilingual children’s book titled “Bad Hair Does Not Exist!” that encourages mixed-race and black Latinas to embrace their pelo.
“The book is a tool of cultural solidarity and a tool of empowerment for all of our little girls,” Arzu-Brown told NBC News. “The term ‘Bad hair’ or ‘Pelo Malo’ is divisive to both community and family, and can contribute to low self-esteem.”  


  • Text Hover
This Afro-Latina Mom Wrote a Bilingual Book Called 'Bad Hair Doesn't Exist'

Many of us grew up hearing about “pelo malo,” but Afro-Latina mom Sulma Arzu-Brown wants to make it clear that bad hair doesn’t exist.

MORE: The True Meaning Behind the Natural Hair Movement

The Garifuna, an Afro-Latino from Honduras, Guatemala or Nicaragua, mujer recently published a bilingual children’s book titled “Bad Hair Does Not Exist!” that encourages mixed-race and black Latinas to embrace their pelo.

“The book is a tool of cultural solidarity and a tool of empowerment for all of our little girls,” Arzu-Brown told NBC News. “The term ‘Bad hair’ or ‘Pelo Malo’ is divisive to both community and family, and can contribute to low self-esteem.”  


  • Text Hover
Mom Writes Book, ‘Bad Hair Does Not Exist!’ For Daughters

 “Bad Hair Does Not Exist!” is a new bilingual book that encourages young Black, Afro-Latino, and multi-racial girls to see themselves, and their hair, as beautiful.
Sulma Arzu-Brown, who calls herself a “Garifuna” woman or Afro-Latino from Honduras, was inspired to write the book after her three-year-old daughter’s babysitter commented that little Bella Victoria had “pelo malo,” which is a Spanish term for “bad hair.”
She knew then that she could either be angry or be a part of the solution, so she chose to write a book.


  • Text Hover
BAD HAIR DOES NOT EXIST/PELO MALO NO EXISTE – REVIEW

When my daughter was born, I put a lot of thought into her hair. With a white, wavy-haired father and with me being black (and from Jamaica),  I knew it was going to be at least curly. The only question was how curly. Her coils were relatively loose when she was a baby, but as she got older they got tighter.  Her mane was gorgeous: full and thick with curly brown spirals. I made it my mission to raise my child with full appreciation for her hair.